• New Writers

    New Writers & The Land of Maybe

    The Archipelago   Endless horizon of blue-grey sky and sea. Freckled with spots of green and brown. The wanderer sees all with a pair of black beady eyes. Looking for a place to stay. At last, a refuge! He perched on top of an iron cross, wings wrapping him from the blowing winds. As the sun fell, darkness took over the sky, with dots of pale white forming arbitrary patterns – by Alen Tanoyo     Church Scattered clouds in lines of laced Not a single open face Blackened church of green white steeple Not a view of living people Rusted roof brown and slate Not a friend, a pal, a mate…

  • Young Writer

    To the Rabbits – A Letter

    Listen to poet P. Nuong read a letter that he found in an old rabbit’s burrow back when he was in Year 5.     ES · To the Rabbits To the Rabbits, How can we live with you drawing the life from this wretched land? You have taken our food and our children so forcefully, you have built machines to destroy all that we love and you have waged countless wars against our people and won. Ever since the first time we saw the columns of smoke coming from your cursed inventions, we knew that you would bring utter destruction. Ever since we first saw the masts of your…

  • Talya Rubin

    Talya Rubin and The Pandemic Poetry Project

      Welcome to a New Day If the cherry tree were in blossom like this always, maybe we would not weep at the losses the silences. How a boat moored in the harbour is quiet now. A friend inside it, or not inside it eats dumplings, sips soup, sleeps away from the people she loves in case by breathing too closely on their soft skin, too near to be safe she kills them. A white bloom is sudden, a shock of life, like birth, like the birth of a little girl in my arms, something uncertain and beautiful as a cloud or the sun triumphant from behind a cloud. “Welcome…

  • Alice Stephens,  Interview

    Famous Adopted People: a Novel – by Alice Stephens

    I saw Famous Adopted People at my local library and picked it up for a friend who has an adopted child.  I was in a hurry so I didn’t see the words ‘a novel’  and thought it was a non-fiction book about famous adopted people.  It is not. The book is best described as a rollicking read that explores a range of salient issues around transnational adoption and one that exemplifies how some truths are best told through fiction. At the start of the novel, we meet two young women who are negotiating the complexities of their transnational and racialized identities.  At the center of the story is Lisa Pearl, a Korean-America adoptee who isn’t…